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What you need to know about the link between Heavy Metal Aluminum and Alzheimer's/Dementia -

ALUMINUM'S DEADLY PROPERTIES

A leading Indian scientific authority warns that the use of aluminum cookware may contribute significantly to the development of Alzheimer's disease and other nervous disorders. The National Institute of Nutrition (NIN), which is part of the Indian Council of Medical Research, has concluded that the intake of aluminum compounds from many sources is on the rise and producing detrimental effects on human health. Aluminum cookware is especially dangerous when used to prepare acid foods such as tomatoes, which causes the metal to be leached out. Besides Alzheimer's, toxic levels of aluminum has also been associated with Parkinson's disease, various dementias and bone diseases. NIN doctors expressed special concern for the elderly whose ability to remove these toxins is reduced.

The NIN experts noted that human exposure to aluminum is also on the increase from the water supply. Besides naturally occurring aluminum, other aluminum compounds are added as part of the water treatment process. Also, aluminum is present in many popular OTC and prescription medicines such as antacids, antiperspirants, pain-killers and anti-diarrhea medicines. Besides cookware, aluminum is increasingly being used in food packaging, especially ready-to-cook foods. Additionally, there are many aluminum-containing food additives in use as buffers, neutralizing agents, dough strengtheners and emulsifying agents. Finally, a relative deficiency of aluminum antagonists in the diets such as calcium and iron may increase the accumulation of this toxic mineral.

Reducing Your Risk of Alzheimer's Disease

Alzheimer's disease, or senile dementia of the Alzheimer's type, will be one of America's greatest health problems in coming years. Sixty percent of patients now admitted to nursing homes have this diagnosis, and the number of Alzheimer's victims is projected to increase as much as eight-fold by the middle of the next century.

There is a strong connection between aluminum and Alzheimer's disease. Research clearly demonstrates abnormally high accumulations of aluminum within the brains of Alzheimer's victims. Independent studies performed in Norway, the United Kingdom, France and Canada, show a direct correlation between the prevalence of Alzheimer's disease and aluminum concentrations in the drinking water.1,2,3,4 In fact, one British study reported in the highly respected medical journal The Lancet, showed the risk of developing Alzheimer's disease to be 50 percent greater where drinking water contained high levels of aluminum.5

The connection between aluminum in the brain and Alzheimer's Disease is so convincing that various studies are under way to explore whether aluminum in the brain can be removed, and if so, to determine if this would be beneficial for Alzheimer's patients. One fascinating study also reported in The Lancet, showed that by administering desferrioxamine, a chemical known to remove aluminum and other metals from the body, the progression of dementia associated with Alzheimer's disease was significantly slowed.6

In a recent article appearing in the Townsend Letter for Doctors (November 1993), Dr. Michael A. Weiner, executive director of the Alzheimer's Research Institute, summarized our present understanding of the dangers of aluminum exposure when he stated "... aluminum has been known as a neurotoxic substance for nearly a century. The scientific literature on its toxic effects has now grown to a critical mass. It is not necessary to conclude that aluminum causes Alzheimer's disease to recommend that it be reduced or eliminated as a potential risk. It is the only element noted to accumulate in the tangle-bearing neurons characteristic of the disease and is also found in elevated amounts in four regions of the brain of Alzheimer's patients."

Our exposure to aluminum is certainly nothing new. It is one of the most common elements in the earth's crust and has long made its way into our foods. Ancient man consumed aluminum when rocks were used to mill grain into flour. Minimal exposure to aluminum isn't a problem; our bodies can excrete small amounts very efficiently. Laboratory research has shown that we can handle about twenty milligrams of aluminum ingestion each day.7 Unfortunately, most of us are exposed to and ingest far more aluminum than our bodies can handle.

What are the sources of aluminum that contribute to toxicity? Aluminum is an ingredient in a wide-range of items that many of us use every day. Some of these products include processed foods, medications and even personal hygiene products.

Aluminum is added as an emulsifying agent in many processed cheeses, especially those which are single-sliced. It is found in cake mixes, self-rising flour, prepared doughs, nondairy creamers, pickles and in some brands of baking powder. Aluminum lauryl sulfate is a common ingredient in many shampoos, while several anti dandruff shampoos, including Selsun-Blue, contain magnesium aluminum silicate. Aluminum is an active ingredient in most antiperspirants (aluminum chlorhydrate). However, since people have started becoming more aware of the dangers of aluminum, some "aluminum free" antiperspirants are now being advertised.

Aluminum is readily absorbed by foods cooked in aluminum cookware. In a study conducted at the University of Cincinnati Medical Center, tomatoes cooked in an aluminum pot had a two to four milligram increase in aluminum content per serving.8 Perhaps the most significant source of aluminum exposure comes from medications. Most antacid preparations, for example, may contain 200 milligrams or more of elemental aluminum in a single tablet! That's ten times more than the presumably acceptable 20 milligrams per day. [Note: When purchasing cookware, take a magnet with you to the store to help identify steel cookware. -ed.]

ARTICLES ON ALUMINUM

Aluminum - Aluminum is more likely to accumulate in the brains of people who are magnesium deficient. This includes a large percentage of Americans. Aluminum inactivates an enzyme that protects nerve cells. Malic acid can pull aluminum away from this enzyme, making a place for magnesium. This may be a protection against Alzheimer's disease.

That spray under your arm could be a breast cancer link PDF Madeleine Brindley Mar 1 2006

ICELAND UNDER ATTACK. THREATENED PROTESTORS RAISE STAKES, CALL FOR INTERNATIONAL PROTEST PDF - Alcoa has to find new countries to pollute. In 2003, it was found guilty by the United States Justice Department and the EPA of violating the Clean Air Act at its Rockdale Aluminum smelter near Austin, Texas. The Rockdale smelter was producing 260,000 tons of aluminum a year, while emitting the largest amount of nitrogen oxide and sulfur dioxide of any single source in the country, with the exception of electric utilities. One hundred and four thousand tons of emissions (calculated from Alcoa's own estimates) were pouring annually from the plant; including 40,000 tons of smog-producing nitrogen dioxode and 60,000 tons of acid-rain-generating sulphur dioxide, as well as highly toxic metals such as mercury, copper, lead, and others, which eventually accumulated in Texas lakes and rivers.

TOXIC HEAVY METALS: SOURCES AND SPECIFIC EFFECT - Recent studies suggest that aluminum may be involved in the progression of Alzheimer's Disease, Parkinson's disease, Guam ALS-PD complex, "Dialysis dementia", Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS), senile and presenile dementia, neurofibrillary tangles, clumsiness of movements, staggering when walking and an inability to pronounce words properly (Berkum 1986; Goyer 1991; Shore and Wyatt, 1983). To date, however, we do not completely understand the role that aluminum plays in the progression of such human degenerative syndromes.
Chronic aluminum exposure has contributed directly to hepatic failure, renal failure, and dementia (Arieff et al., 1979). Other symptoms that have been observed in individuals with high internal concentrations of aluminum are colic, convulsions, esophagitis, gastroenteritis, kidney damage, liver dysfunction, loss of appetite, loss of balance, muscle pain, psychosis, shortness of breath, weakness, and fatigue (ATSDR 1990). Behavioral difficulties among schoolchildren have also been correlated with elevated levels of aluminum and other neuro-toxic heavy metals (Goyer 1991). And, aluminum toxicity may also cause birth defects in newborns (ATSDR 1990).

AEROSOL OPERATION CRIMES & COVER-UP by Clifford E Carnicom

US Government Agencies Say Fluoride in Drinking Water Increases Toxicity of Aluminum - fluoride has been observed to have synergistic effects on the toxicity of aluminum

Diseases Associated with Aluminium Intoxication H. Tomlinson, M.B., Ch.B., MRCS., LRCP

Is Hidden True Cause Of Alzheimer's Your Toothpaste? From Paul Kuhlman 5-3-3 - I once picked up a 44,000 pound load of aluminum dioxide powder in the aptly-named town of Bauxite, Arkansas. Noting that the destination for the load was not a processing plant or a mill,
I enquired as to why this load was destined for the Colgate-Palmolive Company. The shipping agent said that the quality of bauxite (Aluminum dioxide) found in Arkansas was too low grade for manufacturing purposes, but was fine for toothpaste.

Avoiding Aluminum - "Aluminum is a protoplasmic poison and a pernicious and persistent neurotoxin". To date no living systems use aluminum as part of a biochemical process.

ALZHEIMER'S DISEASE The McDougall Program - The more plaques that are present, the worse is the mental condition of the patient. Chemical analysis reveals the presence of the metal aluminum at the core of each plaque and within many of the cells found in the plaques.

How to Prevent Aluminum Poisoning

Take Magnesium Malate or Magnesium with Malic Acid. (see below)

Eliminate all sources of aluminum in your environment. Including aluminum cooking utensils. Anodized metal is coated aluminum. Glass cookware is best, but if you use metal cookware, use either stainless steel or cast iron. Most teflon coated pans are aluminum based but there are now stainless steel pans with non-stick surfaces. Be aware, however, there are controversies about the health affects of non-stick materials.

You should get you or your children tasted for heavy metal levels. Then you may want to take Oral Chelation. Both testing and products are available at Extreme Health or your local homeopathic doctor.

Avoid fluoride. Fluoride appears to allow aluminum to penetrate the blood-brain barrier.

Read NATURAL HEALING for the Chemtrail Syndrome by Marguerite Elsbeth Free Downloadable Ebook!


SOURCES OF ALUMINUM INGESTION

Additives: The following additives contain aluminum compounds: E173, E520, E521, E523 E541, E545, E554, E555 E556, E559, bauxite (Aluminum dioxide)
Antacids: can contain 200 milligrams or more of elemental aluminum in a single tablet! A very popular antacid, Amphojel, consists of aluminum hydroxide.
Antiperspirants can contain aluminum chlorhydrate. Colgate-Palmolive products do contain aluminum zirconium.
Baking powder: some brands can contain aluminum
Cake mixes: can contain forms of aluminum
Cheese: especially single sliced processed cheese can contain aluminum as an emulsifier
Chocolate Mixes: highly absorbable aluminum maltol is used in instant chocolate mixes. Coffee Whiteners: Like Coffee-mate - Sodium Aluminosilicate
Doughs: prepared doughs can contain it. Flour: self rising flour can contain aluminum
Metal Cleaners such as Ezy bright contain aluminum oxide 10-30%
Pickles can contain aluminum
Shampoos: Aluminum lauryl sulfate
Anti dandruff shampoos, including Selsun-Blue, contain magnesium aluminum silicate
Toothpastes: Can contain bauxite (Aluminum dioxide) or aluminum salts and it may not be listed in the ingredients! Tooth whitening products also.
Water: Drinking water in many countries contains high levels of AL.

Food Additives - A handy guide to lookup what those numbers mean on the ingredients list.


How to detox your body from Aluminum build-up!

Aluminum has been the focus of much negative attention lately -- numerous studies have indicated that aluminum accumulates in the body, especially in nerve tissues, potentially causing harm. Recently, scientific research have discovered that one compound may have the powerful effect of diminishing this unwanted aluminum accumulation. On the cutting edge of nutrition Science there is a powerfully protective compound: Magnesium Malate.

The Dangers of Aluminum

Aluminum is a naturally occurring metal. It has been the subject of recent studies on aging, and some scientists consider it to be harmful. It may come as a surprise that aluminum can be found in a wide variety of foods and manufactured products, such as baking powder, non-dairy creamers, antacids, deodorants, cookware, and food containers. Even tap water contains aluminum. With so many possible avenues for ingesting aluminum, we may be consuming more than nature originally intended. Mounting evidence that aluminum tends to accumulate in the body is even cause for alarm. Unfortunately, there are no overt warning signs of excess aluminum accumulation, until levels become high enough to have adverse effects on health.

The Aluminum - Magnesium Link

Research have suggested that aluminum may be more likely to accumulate in the brains of persons whose diets are magnesium-deficient -- which, unfortunately, includes 90% of Americans! Several studies have shown that animals fed diets low in magnesium accumulate high concentrations of aluminum in the Central Nervous System. One of magnesium's many functions is to activate the enzyme tubulin involved in the maintenance of nerve tissue cells. It has been suggested that when there is not enough Magnesium in the body to plug into the appropriate receptor site on the tubulin enzyme, aluminum takes its place instead. This leads to the inactivation of tubulin and, consequently, inadequate nerve function. Because a Magnesium-deficient diet may increase the amount of aluminum taken up and stored by the body, it is vitally important that we take in sufficient amounts.

Magnesium Malate- a One - Two Punch

Magnesium Malate supplies a one-two punch in combating excess aluminum accumulation. In addition to providing 45% of the U.S.R.D.A. for magnesium, Magnesium Malate also supplies Malic Acid. Found abundantly in fruits such as apples, Malic Acid is also produced in the human body. It is a metabolite of the Krebs cycle the set of biochemical reactions used to produce 90% of all energy in the cells of the body. Malic Acid readily crosses the Blood-Brain-Barrier and has been shown to bind to aluminum. It functions in the body by drawing aluminum away from the tubulin enzyme, so that Magnesium can plug into the receptor sites instead. Malic Acid's unique ability to bind with aluminum means it can be flushed out of the body, preventing unwanted build-up.

The Pro-active Approach

With all the negative evidence mounting against aluminum, educated consumers will want to take precautions in order to maintain their health and well being. Of course, the best way to avoid excess aluminum is to cut back on aluminum intake from known sources. Use only stainless steel of cast iron cookware, and look for aluminum-free antacids and deodorants. Always use filtered or spring water for drinking and cooking. And for those who want to take a pro-active approach, adding Magnesium Malate to your supplement regimen may be your best bet in depleting unwanted aluminum build-up in the body.

Excerpts from VitaNet Online where Magnesium Malate can be ordered 1 800 877-8702
Other sources to purchase Magnesium Malate can be found in our Merchandise Section

 

Analysis: Alzheimer's drug pipeline loaded
By ED SUSMAN

MADRID, July 21 (UPI) -- The dreaded illness Alzheimer's disease -- the sickness that gradually robs people of their minds and bodies -- remains incurable -- but, doctors hope, not unbeatable.

At this week's 10th International Conference on Alzheimer's Disease and Related Disorders in Madrid, doctors warned that unless they discover ways to slow down or halt the disease, the health services of the world will be bankrupted.

The Chicago-based Arthritis Association estimated that 4.5 million people in the United States and 15 million worldwide have Alzheimer's disease. By 2050, 16 million people will be fighting the disease.

"I can tell you that when we started about 20 years ago we had little hope that we could find drugs that could impact this disease," said Howard Fillit, executive director of the Institute for the Study of Aging in New York.

But today there are already several drugs marketed that slow the disease, and Fillit told United Press International, "There is an absolute explosion in the number of drugs in development. We are going to change the world in the next five to 10 years."

Fillit moderated a news briefing at which researchers described some of those drugs, most of which are still at the fringes of discovery. Many others were also scrutinized by the 5,000-plus clinicians and allied healthcare professionals drawn to Madrid for the weeklong meeting.

In one new treatment, researchers at Eli Lilly, Indianapolis, Ind., developed an antibody that targets an abnormal beta-amyloid particle in the brain. Amyloid is one of the substances that, when out of control, interrupts brain messaging and builds damaging structures in the brain.

Eric Siemers, a Lilly researcher, said the amyloid-beta antibody was tested in 19 Alzheimer's patients. They were given a single dose of the drug and observed that the amount of amyloid protein in the blood rose markedly. Siemers suggested that means that the antibody is binding with the unwanted amyloid product and bringing it into the blood stream and out of the brain.

However, cognitive functioning tests did not indicate that the drug was making any impact on the disease. Nevertheless, Siemers said studies will continue in larger groups of patients.

Another attack on amyloid-associated aberrant behavior in Alzheimer's disease was launched by Ashley Bush, a consultant to Prana Biotechnology of Parkville, Australia.

He looked at the abnormal handling of essential brain metals -- copper, zinc and iron -- and how that leads to formation of beta-amyloid oligomers, or abnormal assemblies -- in the brain.

He and colleagues developed PBT2, an analog of the antiquated antibiotic clioquinol. When mice with Alzheimer's-like disease were treated with PBT2, half of the plaques in the animal brains disappeared.

Bush said that on the basis of the study, a phase 2 trial in humans with PBT2 has been initiated.

Other researchers hunting for the reason that tramiprosate (Alzhemed) -- now in phase 3 clinical studies in the United States and Europe -- appears to improve outcomes in Alzheimer's disease found that the drug prevents cells in the brain from dying.

Scientists studying the brain cells of rats observed that in the presence of amyloid beta, 58 percent of neurons underwent programmed cell death known as apoptosis. But when the cells were protected with tramiprosate, the cellular death toll was lowered by 40 percent.

"We saw a strong additional neuroprotective effect. This, with further verification, will take this drug forward and into a potentially rich new area of efficacy studies," said Daniel DeLorme, vice president for research at Neurochem Inc. in Laval, Quebec, Canada.

Paul Aisen, professor of neurology at Georgetown University Medical Center, Washington, added, "The molecular cause of Alzheimer's disease is the amyloid peptide. The amyloid peptide accumulates in the Alzheimer's brain and is damaging to neurons and synapses and neuronal function in general. We've known for some time that treatment with tramiprosate reduces the accumulation of amyloid in the brain. With this study, our information has been extended to show that it is also protective against amyloid-mediated neuronal damage. That's what's new here."

Alain Robillard, associate clinical professor in neurology at Maisonneuve-Rosemont Hospital, University of Montreal-affiliate hospital, told UPI, "The mode of action that we have in evidence here indicates and supports what we supposed in the phase 2 trial. It appears possible that the mechanism of action of this drug will prevent fewer plaques from forming, ergo, less disease."

Doctors in Switzerland are moving forward with a new cholinesterase inhibitor, now known as ZT-1, being developed by Debiopharm of Lausanne, even though early tests didn't show significant results.

Emmanuel Tamches, the project director for Debiopharm, told UPI he believes further double-blind testing will show that the drug is at least as effective as donepezil (Aricept) and may have fewer side effects, including less chance of heart-rhythm disturbances.

Still other possible drugs include Gaithersburg, Md.-based Panacea Pharmaceuticals' PAN-811, an agent that in laboratory experiments protected primary neurons from amyloid toxicity.

And Neuro Pharma of Madrid went to the oceans to find inhibitors of glycogen synthase kinase-3-beta. That compound is necessary for halting a cascade of molecular events that feeds the Alzheimer's process. Palinurin and tricantin, substances extracted from a marine sponge, appear to inhibit glycogen synthase kinase-3-beta in laboratory testing.

"We are very encouraged to see a diversity of approaches to treating Alzheimer's showing some level of success," Fillit said. "We must pursue every available avenue. The urgency has never been higher." © Copyright 2006 United Press International, Inc. All Rights Reserved